English Espaņol
Advertisement
Page 1 of 10 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 92

Thread: One Significant Technical Origin Of GGG's Power

  1. #1
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,027

    One Significant Technical Origin Of GGG's Power

    We all know GGG is a power hitter.

    He believes in his power and he wants to let it go. However, looking at the way he fought Stevens on the weekend there were times there when (power aside) Gennady looked awfully uncoordinated, open and in some cases vulnerable to guys like Ward and Maybe Floyd; whom may catch Golovkin making some fundamental mistakes and make him pay before the reverse happened.

    OK, so, that is said. Still though Gennady is an absolute powerhouse. His KO percentage tells us that.

    But then too he is still only flesh and blood. Only a given amount of torque and speed can be created by the muscles and energy reserves within a human body. Put that together with moving mass and you have the laws of physics. Outside of black holes they don't change much either, particularly on this earth.

    What this means is that, according to the laws of physics, GGG is probably not capable of potentially generating more force and power than any other well conditioned/experienced boxing athlete with similar muscle mass.

    So then what are a few of the most significant things that GGG does technically or otherwise that allows him to generate and deliver so much power in a punch?

    There have been a few others that do it, but not too many. And I was wondering if anyone here on this site wants to give it a crack.

    What is one of the most significant technical reasons that allows GGG to punch and blow guys away?

    Over to you guys at TSS . . . . .
    Last edited by stormcentre; 11-05-2013 at 10:36 AM.

  2. #2
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,027

    Re: One Significant Technical Origin Of GGG's Power

    Oh .. . by the way, what it is, when defined will (should) play a large part of anyone's game-plan to beating and/or living with this guy for 12 rounds.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    297

    Re: One Significant Technical Origin Of GGG's Power

    By torquing his feet, he creates maximum possibility for torquing his hips - the back follows, and the arm/hand lands like a sledgehammer. He does this with his body in perfect balance, feet at the right distance between them to be well grounded (and thus a bit slow in movement) and thereby generating energy from beneath. But the real key here is torquing - or twisting - the foot, or rather the heel, and do it both subtle and quick. Tszyu - whom I think you've studied a bit - used to maximize this movement in order to enhance the power he generated.

    In order to do this during a fight I'd say your whole way of fighting is affected, in that the footwork is crucial - and not in the way that most people refer to footwork. Itīs hard, virtually impossible, to be a dancing star while you're constantly shifting balance/twisting the feet in this way. This is, by the way, how I train my little group of young boxers - and with the rare and few exceptions, they grow tired before they've developed the necessary motoric level to execute it. Itīs difficult, itīs unnatural - like all boxing is, in many ways - and it's a recipe for strong, well balanced positions and generating power they couldn't have dreamed of.

    Puh. Whenever I try to go into some depths in discussions on technical matters, my english is tested, so sorry about possible peculiarities.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    348

    Re: One Significant Technical Origin Of GGG's Power

    First of all, thanks for making a thread. Nothing against Editor Mike, but it's kind of nice to have some variety. I've tried several myself, but usually the response has been meager, so I've given it a rest of late.

    Now, as to your question, I'm sure that my answer is not "the one" that you are looking for, but here it is:

    Gennady's boxing stance is distinctly more "forward-leaning" or "leaning in" than most. The advantage with this comes down to leverage on his punches. I.e. his feet are always firmly planted, and his torso is 'cooperating' with the direction of his blows. Others stand more erect or even lean back from the waist up. It's one reason why Mayweather, for example, is no one-punch-KO type of fighter. The disadvantage, IMO, is that such close proximity naturally puts you in range to get tagged more yourself (and we did see this against Stevens). Fortunately for GGG, he appears to have a pretty good chin. Again, because Mayweather is the most backward-leaning boxer I know of, he rarely get hit square.

    BTW: I typed my post before seeing Grimm's above mine.
    Last edited by Hop; 11-05-2013 at 11:17 AM.

  5. #5
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,027

    Re: One Significant Technical Origin Of GGG's Power

    Quote Originally Posted by Grimm View Post
    By torquing his feet, he creates maximum possibility for torquing his hips - the back follows, and the arm/hand lands like a sledgehammer. He does this with his body in perfect balance, feet at the right distance between them to be well grounded (and thus a bit slow in movement) and thereby generating energy from beneath. But the real key here is torquing - or twisting - the foot, or rather the heel, and do it both subtle and quick. Tszyu - whom I think you've studied a bit - used to maximize this movement in order to enhance the power he generated.

    In order to do this during a fight I'd say your whole way of fighting is affected, in that the footwork is crucial - and not in the way that most people refer to footwork. Itīs hard, virtually impossible, to be a dancing star while you're constantly shifting balance/twisting the feet in this way. This is, by the way, how I train my little group of young boxers - and with the rare and few exceptions, they grow tired before they've developed the necessary motoric level to execute it. Itīs difficult, itīs unnatural - like all boxing is, in many ways - and it's a recipe for strong, well balanced positions and generating power they couldn't have dreamed of.

    Puh. Whenever I try to go into some depths in discussions on technical matters, my english is tested, so sorry about possible peculiarities.

    All very good points but they're not it.

  6. #6
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,027

    Re: One Significant Technical Origin Of GGG's Power

    Quote Originally Posted by Hop View Post
    First of all, thanks for making a thread. Nothing against Editor Mike, but it's kind of nice to have some variety. I've tried several myself, but usually the response has been meager, so I've given it a rest of late.

    Now, as to your question, I'm sure that my answer is not "the one" that you are looking for, but here it is:

    Gennady's boxing stance is distinctly more "forward-leaning" or "leaning in" than most. The advantage with this comes down to leverage on his punches. I.e. his feet are always firmly planted, and his torso is 'cooperating' with the direction of his blows. Others stand more erect or even lean back from the waist up. It's one reason why Mayweather, for example, is no one-punch-KO type of fighter. The disadvantage, IMO, is that such close proximity naturally puts you in range to get tagged more yourself (and we did see this against Stevens). Fortunately for GGG, he appears to have a pretty good chin. Again, because Mayweather is the most backward-leaning boxer I know of, he rarely get hit square.

    BTW: I typed my post before seeing Grimm's above mine.
    You were close with the leverage on punches bit, but then went off target. Still, all good points.

  7. #7
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,027

    Re: One Significant Technical Origin Of GGG's Power

    I wonder who else is out there that can nail this? RG and a few of the other senior and more advanced posters perhaps?

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    3,623

    Re: One Significant Technical Origin Of GGG's Power

    technique and fundamentals are very important along with genetics. its a combination of all. fast twitch vs slow twitch muscle fibers play a part as well, hence genetics...

    i was 17 years old and 165 lbs and hitting homeruns 450 feet.

    although i wasnt huge and strong on the bench press i had very fast hands and the ability to torque when i turned them over during my swing which increased the trampoline effect of the baseball off the bat.

    yes this is baseball, but a related analogy with throwing a punch. in fact very similar movements...starting at your feet and using your hips and hands.

    anyways i was able to us my body and hands to hit the ball, torquing my hips with my hands and was able to increase speed and strength.

    i bench pressed like 240, but hit a baseball 450feet and our catcher benched 325, weighed about 220 and only hit a baseball about 325 feet.

    i think it is a combination of fundamentals, proper technique and genetics.

    boxing- hitting bags, mitts and sparring i remained with very fast hands and proper technique enabled me to have more power.

  9. #9
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,027

    Re: One Significant Technical Origin Of GGG's Power

    Quote Originally Posted by amayseng View Post
    technique and fundamentals are very important along with genetics. its a combination of all. fast twitch vs slow twitch muscle fibers play a part as well, hence genetics...

    i was 17 years old and 165 lbs and hitting homeruns 450 feet.

    although i wasnt huge and strong on the bench press i had very fast hands and the ability to torque when i turned them over during my swing which increased the trampoline effect of the baseball off the bat.

    yes this is baseball, but a related analogy with throwing a punch. in fact very similar movements...starting at your feet and using your hips and hands.

    anyways i was able to us my body and hands to hit the ball, torquing my hips with my hands and was able to increase speed and strength.

    i bench pressed like 240, but hit a baseball 450feet and our catcher benched 325, weighed about 220 and only hit a baseball about 325 feet.

    i think it is a combination of fundamentals, proper technique and genetics.

    boxing- hitting bags, mitts and sparring i remained with very fast hands and proper technique enabled me to have more power.


    Wow man, that's pretty impressive for a 17 year old. You're right the fundamentals of pitching - particularly from the chest down - do have similarities to punching. And yes, fast twitch muscle fibres are the ones to train for speed and boxing; in my opinion too.

    To my main point; I was thinking of something else and when I do say it you're all going to get it and understand what I mean and how elegantly simple and obvious it is. There is another great heavyweight boxer that did exactly the same thing, including to some extent how he set things up, with equally devastating power.

  10. #10
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,027

    Re: One Significant Technical Origin Of GGG's Power

    Hmm, I was thinking that with all the popularity that GGG has and all the talk about his style and potential there would be more knowledge and interest on this.

    Especially with the more experienced posters here that know a lot about the sport.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •