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Thread: VICTORIOUS RIGONDEAUX LIKES HIS STYLE JUST FINE

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    Victorious rigondeaux likes his style just fine


    ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. – When you stop and think about it, boxing fans are no different than moviegoers that have to decide which flick they want to see on a given night out. Whether you’re heading to the arena or your local cinema, the choice sometimes has to be made between The Fast and the Furious and Driving Miss Daisy.
    No one can dispute that Guillermo Rigondeaux (13-0, 8KOs), who successfully defended his WBA and WBO super bantamweight championships here Saturday night with a typically efficient unanimous decision over Joseph Agbeko (29-5, 22 KOs), is a defensive genius. Most opponents can barely touch the two-time Olympic gold medalist from Cuba when he is in peak form, and the 33-year-old southpaw certainly appeared to be at or near the top of his game against Agbeko, a former two-time world bantamweight titlist from Ghana who would have preferred to turn the fight into a pugilistic demolition derby instead of another mostly uneventful drive down safe streets by the man known as “El Chacal.” Judges Ron McNair, Eugene Grant and Robin Taylor all had Rigondeaux pitching a 120-108 shutout.
    Really, how we get our entertainment is a matter of personal preference, and there are those who will always prefer a screeching, high-speed ride on the wild side to someone expertly demonstrating the proper way to parallel-park.
    Count Top Rank founder and CEO Bob Arum, who promotes the Miami-based Rigondeaux, among those who would like to see the master technician add a bit more pizzazz to his exquisite displays of ring generalship. Like a lot of people, Arum has a fondness for guys who go down in the trenches, to spill a little blood, even if some of it is their own, and score dramatic knockouts.
    After Rigondeaux’s nearly flawless unanimous decision on April 13 over Nonito Donaire, the Boxing Writers Association of America’s 2012 Fighter of the Year, Arum – who also promotes Donaire – reacted to the outcome as if he’d just found a roach floating in the punch bowl at the party he was throwing. He complained that Rigondeaux was not a TV-friendly kind of fighter, and that “every time I mention him (to HBO Sports executives), they throw up.”
    The suits at HBO, which televised three of Saturday night’s bouts in the Adrian Phillips Ballroom of Boardwalk Hall – super welterweight slugger James Kirkland (32-1, 28 KOs) weathered an early assault from Glen Tapia (20-1, 12 KOs) to score a brutal, sixth-round technical knockout and two-time former world title challenger Matthew Macklin (30-5, 20 KOs) scored a 10-round, unanimous decision over Lamar Russ (14-1, 7 KOs) in the others – apparently suppressed their gag reflexes long enough to give Rigondeaux another high-visibility shot at winning over viewers who worshipped at the altar of the late Arturo Gatti. Suffice to say the jury is still out as far as future projections regarding Rigondeaux’s ability to ever produce the kind of thrills and high Nielsen ratings Gatti so routinely delivered.
    “I wouldn’t blame HBO for never putting Rigondeaux back on,” longtime HBO analyst Larry Merchant said after the Cuban, who defected to the United States in February 2009, had clinically dissected Donaire. “I think Rigondeaux is a talented, beautiful boxer, but prizefighting is about entertainment. You want a fighter that can excite.”
    For his part, Rigondeaux – who believes he is a better all-around fighter, pound-for-pound, than Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Andre Ward – isn’t disposed to do much tinkering. What’s that saying? If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.
    “I fight my own way, my own style,” Rigondeaux said a couple of days before he schooled Agbeko. “I do what I need to do to win.”
    And what of Arum’s occasionally unflattering critiques of Rigondeaux’s obviously successful but comparatively bland style?
    “Bob Arum is not the one doing the fighting,” Rigondeaux said. “If he’s not pleased with me or how I fight, maybe he should consider letting me out of my contract. I’m sure there are other promoters who would love to have Guillermo Rigondeaux fighting for them.”
    Upon further review, as NFL officials are wont to say, Rigondeaux softened that stance somewhat. Hey, Arum is still signing his paychecks.
    “I understand Bob Arum has a job to do,” he said. “I’m very appreciative that Bob Arum has helped me make some money. I have nothing bad to say about him.”
    Of course, Rigondeaux would like for Arum not to have anything bad to say about him, either. Telling it like it is, or how you think it is, is a knife that cuts both ways.
    “In the ring, I always feel that I can do whatever I want, that I’m in total control at all times,” said Rigondeaux, who added that his punching power is often underrated by media know-nothings who see only his impenetrable defense. “Anybody can beat anybody else on a given night, right? That’s what they say. So let the others think they have a chance to beat me. Line them up. I’ll fight anybody. But the problem is that nobody wants to fight me.”
    Agbeko might have wanted to fight, but he spent 12 rounds pawing at the empty air that Rigondeaux had just vacated. The punch stats were, action-craving spectators, abysmal: Agbeko landed just 48 of 349 (14 percent) to 144 of 859 (17 percent) for Rigondeaux. Both finished below the dreaded Mendoza Line.
    “It was just hard to get to him,”Agbeko said. “He’s very fast and he has great foot movement.”
    For his part, Rigondeaux was hardly dismayed by the sporadic boos and catcalls that rang out in the last several rounds.
    “I’m the No. 1 fighter now,” he proclaimed. “Donaire is still traumatized since I beat him.”
    Buoyed by a crowd that was very vocal in its support for him, Tapia, a resident of Passaic, N.J., who sold over 1,000 tickets to family members, friends and supporters, came out winging in the first round against Kirkland. By the time the bell rang to end the stanza, Kirkland had a mouse under his left eye and the understanding he probably was in not in for the easiest of nights.
    But electing to stand and trade with Kirkland, one of boxing’s more damage-inflicting hitters, is probably a dubious strategy, as Tapia soon came to realize. Kirkland began to get far the better of the exchanges and by the end of the fifth Tapia looked ready to go – more than ready, in fact. Referee Steve Smoger appeared inclined to stop the bout then, but ring physician Blair Bergen looked Tapia over and, with some hesitation, gave the OK for him to continue.
    “I did (think about stopping it), but the doctor told me it was all right for (Tapia) to continue,” Smoger said. “I was on the verge of doing it a couple of times, but then the kid returned fire.”
    Tapia, however, was only on the receiving end, all but defenseless, when Smoger wrapped his protective arms around him 38 seconds into Round 6.
    Kirkland, who landed 305 of 644 punches – 287 of the connects were power shots – lauded the bloodied Tapia, who was quickly taken to AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center, for the courage he had displayed.
    “It was a real war,” Kirkland said. “I told everyone it would be this way. We traded some good shots. I came in with a game plan and I stuck to it. I had to be a warrior, and I was.”
    Macklin, who was able to impose his superior strength on Russ and wear him down a bit more with each succeeding round, immediately called for a rematch with Germany’s Felix Sturm (39-3-2, 18 KOs), who dethroned IBF champion Darren Barker (26-2, 16 KOs) on an emphatic second-round stoppage Saturday in Stuttgart, Germany. When they met on June 25, 2011, Sturm retained the WBA 160-pound crown on a split decision.
    “I feel good,” Macklin said after he had handed Russ his first professional defeat. “I was a little impatient in the beginning, trying for the knockout. I relaxed later and felt more comfortable.”
    In non-televised bouts of note, super featherweight Toka Kahn Clary (9-0-1, 6 KOs) scored a six-round unanimous decision over Ramsey Luna (11-1, 5 KOs) in a battle of unbeatens; super middleweight prospect Jesse Hart (11-0, 10 KOs) continued to impress with a first-round stoppage of Tyrell Hendrix (10-3-1, 3 KOs), and Russian middleweight Matt Korobov (22-0, 13 KOs), who was wobbled in Round 1, seized control thereafter, dropping a game Derek Edwards (26-3-1, 13 KOs) three times in all before Smoger stepped in 28 seconds into the ninth round.

  2. #2
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    Re: VICTORIOUS RIGONDEAUX LIKES HIS STYLE JUST FINE

    "The Jersey Boy" was a feast for "Mandingo Warrior" beast. Holla!

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    Re: VICTORIOUS RIGONDEAUX LIKES HIS STYLE JUST FINE

    Kirkland was incredible... Unbelievable comeback.. Anne Wolfe is a beast. They better pick his opponents carefully.

    But I consider his fight more like halftime intermission entertainment than boxing..
    I know the audience was greatful.

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    Re: VICTORIOUS RIGONDEAUX LIKES HIS STYLE JUST FINE

    What happened to Agbeko never saw him fight in survival mode before
    Maybe he had a date and didn't want to get his hair mussed.
    Next time get Rigo an opponent who will fight back.

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    Re: VICTORIOUS RIGONDEAUX LIKES HIS STYLE JUST FINE

    Donaire needs to stay as far away from Rigondeaux as possible. Like Shavers used to say he needs to get amnesia when he hears his name. I liked the drive in a screeching car to the parallel parking analogy because Rigondeaux's style is about as exciting as that. Just like 3rd Bass had RAPE rappers against phony entertainers I would like to have FABB fans against boring boxers. I like great skills but I like some entertainment value too otherwise I could just read a good book and it would be time better utilized. But happy to see Rigo is off punishment for beating Donaire.

    As far as Kirkland it was an entertaining fight. He needs defense. Rigondeaux takes things to the extreme and so does Kirkland. They are polar opposites. I wish Kirkland had of cupped his last punch a bit more to the right and hit Smoger right in his head. Smoger gave him a free shot at Garcia. Smoger should have stopped Kirkland from throwing not hugged the defenseless Garcia giving Kirkland a free one.

    That was too much boxing for one day. Now we have to go into the drought after next week until the end of January.

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    Re: VICTORIOUS RIGONDEAUX LIKES HIS STYLE JUST FINE

    Excuse me, Tapia not Garcia. It gets confusing sometime.

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    Re: VICTORIOUS RIGONDEAUX LIKES HIS STYLE JUST FINE

    You mofus are just lefty hating the Cuban Willie. Hehehe! He shutdown King Kong. Now where is Godzilla? Willie is lookin' for him. Hahaha! Holla!

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    Re: VICTORIOUS RIGONDEAUX LIKES HIS STYLE JUST FINE

    Quote Originally Posted by Radam G View Post
    You mofus are just lefty hating the Cuban Willie. Hehehe! He shutdown King Kong. Now where is Godzilla? Willie is lookin' for him. Hahaha! Holla!
    It's just the perception of him that's bad and everything he does will get viewed through that filter. If it was Mayweather, Ward or B-Hop, they would be saying "masterpiece!"

    One of the tricks they teach you in psychology and theory of persuasion is that you can point perception of a phenomenon in a certain direction by creating a filter through which it is viewed.

    Or optical illusions, if you will, as you so poignantly often point out, RG.

    Here's a fun game. Who do you like better, Theresa or Adolf?

    Theresa is a happy, opportunistic, driven, talented, determined person.

    Adolf is a cynical, opportunistic, driven, determined, talented person.

    In the above examples, only the first word is different. But 9/10 people -- especially if the examples were spaced further apart -- would find Theresa a nicer person, simply because the initial filter you see the person through will shape your overall perception of the totality of the individual.

    To me, I feel like Rigo suffers from the same crap. And all these reports keep reinforcing that filter and perpetuating that stereotype.

    Dude never clinches, never grabs, he's never scared, and he's flashy with his defense.

    If the content providers made a better effort to educate its viewers about the sweet science, like the NBA and NFL do with its analysts pointing out certain subtleties -- Showtime actually used to do this with that Mensa boy Bobb Czyz -- perhaps people would appreciate the art and science more.

    Defense wins championships. High-scoring games are fun. Yeah, the Phoenix Suns were fun to watch. Yeah, the early 2000s Rams were incredible to watch. But they rarely make it to the finish line.

    Spurs do. Pistons do. Ravens. Mayweather. Ward. Rigondeaux.

    Guys like Kirkland are boxing's equivalent of those high-octane, shootout sports teams. But by no means should that be a reflection of the entire sport!

    For me, I get too uncomfortable when guys take too many flush shots because 1) I know it doesn't feel good and 2) brain damage is real and I know through experience.

    Bottom line, he should get credit. And not every lazy headline about him should be about style.

    Talk about his character instead. Or his impressive poise, his unbelievable balance, his remarkable patience, his astute understanding of the ring, his unmatched ring generalship etc.

    My headline would read something like this: "The Jackal Rigondeaux tames King Kong in another masterful display of the sweet science" or "Rigondeaux reduces King Kong to harmless chimp."

    That's my daily rant, LOL!

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    Re: VICTORIOUS RIGONDEAUX LIKES HIS STYLE JUST FINE

    I totally disagree with you guys. It has nothing to do with lefties. I have a left hand too and I'm very fond of it. The boring boxers with great skills get their due as the are on top of the p4p lists. I understand the brilliance of them applying their craft. The problem is that they just aren't exciting. I don't like watching guys with bar fighting skills either. I like guys with skills, defense and that will go out and step up the offense too. Duran was a guy that was highly offensive but was also extremely good defensively. He just never got credit for it. You are going to get hit sometimes in boxing. Guys that go out there and never think they are going to get hit are delusional. I understand trying to minimize contact but some fighters take the safety first fighting and defensive fighting to a level where they stink out the place. That will always be part of their headlines. They can be hard to watch. The great basketball teams of the 80's the Bulls, Lakers and Celtics could not have won without great defense and all other facets of the game but they were so fun to watch. It was show time. That's what I'm talking about. The hesitant to punch, hugging, holding boxers are not entertaining. If they are defensive wizards that do punch now you have my attention.

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    Re: VICTORIOUS RIGONDEAUX LIKES HIS STYLE JUST FINE

    Quote Originally Posted by DaveB View Post
    The hesitant to punch, hugging, holding boxers are not entertaining. If they are defensive wizards that do punch now you have my attention.
    Bold sounds like Wlad to me. Underlined sounds like Rigo to me.

    What did you mean about it has nothing to do with lefties?

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