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Thread: Am I The Only One Who Wondered About Those "Hispanically Unique" Cuban Names? Check This Article...

  1. #1
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    Am I The Only One Who Wondered About Those "Hispanically Unique" Cuban Names? Check This Article...

    Whenever I would read about Cuban boxers, I always wondered why the heck Cubans would have these unique names -- Odlanier, Yuriorkis, Erislandy, Yoelvis, Dayesi -- that would deviate tremendously from traditional Spanish names like Juan, Sergio, Julio, Miguel and so on...

    And I could never find out the origin or etymology of these names. Until today...

    Turns out "Odlanier" really is just the more traditional "Reinaldo" backwards. "Dayesi" is "Yes" in three languages turned into a name. (Talk about Daniel Bryan-like positive affirmations!)

    Who the heck knew?!

    I sure didn't.

    Anyway, check out this BBC article. It's quite fascinating.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-18270547

  2. #2
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    Re: Am I The Only One Who Wondered About Those "Hispanically Unique" Cuban Names? Check This Article...

    Quote Originally Posted by The Shadow View Post
    Whenever I would read about Cuban boxers, I always wondered why the heck Cubans would have these unique names -- Odlanier, Yuriorkis, Erislandy, Yoelvis, Dayesi -- that would deviate tremendously from traditional Spanish names like Juan, Sergio, Julio, Miguel and so on...

    And I could never find out the origin or etymology of these names. Until today...

    Turns out "Odlanier" really is just the more traditional "Reinaldo" backwards. "Dayesi" is "Yes" in three languages turned into a name. (Talk about Daniel Bryan-like positive affirmations!)

    Who the heck knew?!

    I sure didn't.

    Anyway, check out this BBC article. It's quite fascinating.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-18270547
    I thought you knew that, The Shadow, because it is not just happening in Cuba, but the P-Islands, the USA and other places.

    The leading example is right in this Universe. B-Sug put his two heroes' -- Joe "The Brown Bomber" Louis and "Sugar" Ray Robinson -- boksing pseudonyms together and came up with BrownSugar. The late boxing scribe Mark Kram, who wrote "Ghosts of Manila," is another example. Dig how his parents marked him by spelling the last name backward to first name him.

    My sister Lydia and her husband Manuel combined parts of their names to name their first born "Lynuel." My uncle and auntie combined parts of their names of Jamil and Malila to name my super-Mensa cousin "Jalila." Holla!

  3. #3
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    Re: Am I The Only One Who Wondered About Those "Hispanically Unique" Cuban Names? Check This Article...

    Radam, a nurse at the hospital I work at is Cuban- American. I asked her who came up with her name. Belkis. She said her mom and pops thought it was lovely. a bell and a kiss.

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    Re: Am I The Only One Who Wondered About Those "Hispanically Unique" Cuban Names? Check This Article...

    Quote Originally Posted by Radam G View Post
    I thought you knew that, The Shadow, because it is not just happening in Cuba, but the P-Islands, the USA and other places.

    The leading example is right in this Universe. B-Sug put his two heroes' -- Joe "The Brown Bomber" Louis and "Sugar" Ray Robinson -- boksing pseudonyms together and came up with BrownSugar. The late boxing scribe Mark Kram, who wrote "Ghosts of Manila," is another example. Dig how his parents marked him by spelling the last name backward to first name him.

    My sister Lydia and her husband Manuel combined parts of their names to name their first born "Lynuel." My uncle and auntie combined parts of their names of Jamil and Malila to name my super-Mensa cousin "Jalila." Holla!
    Really? I thought Brownsugar was an ode to his oh-so sweet ways with da ladiesssss!

    I found it fascinating. I always wondered why their names were so unique and hard to pronounce.

    Even Guillermo Rigondeaux pronounces his name differently. It's really French and is supposed to be Ri-gon-do, but the Cuban flavor turns it into Ri-'GON-dee-aw.

    Of course disapora black folks get creative with it too.

    My uncles and cousins are Kenneth, Peter, John and Michael. Next generation? 'Isha and 'ika suffixes left and right, La and Da prefixes galore and much more creativity to pronounce originality.

    Belkis is right up that Cuban alley. Like "Usnavi" after the US Navy and so forth.

    Gotta love culture.
    Last edited by The Shadow; 04-25-2014 at 07:58 PM.

  5. #5
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    Re: Am I The Only One Who Wondered About Those "Hispanically Unique" Cuban Names? Check This Article...

    Quote Originally Posted by deepwater2 View Post
    Radam, a nurse at the hospital I work at is Cuban- American. I asked her who came up with her name. Belkis. She said her mom and pops thought it was lovely. a bell and a kiss.
    Very interesting, I know a Honduran young lady with the same name.

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