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Thread: Does it Bother You When a Boxer with only a handful of Fights gets to Fight for a Title?

  1. #1
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    Does it Bother You When a Boxer with only a handful of Fights gets to Fight for a Title?

    Vasyl Lomachenko got to fight for a world title (WBO) in only his second pro fight.

    Guillermo Rigondeaux won a world title (WBA) in his ninth pro fight.

    Zou Shiming has only five fights under his belt but yet may be only one fight removed from a title shot.

    Do you think that this is nuts? I have an opinion that I'll share, but first let's hear from the community.

  2. #2
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    Re: Does it Bother You When a Boxer with only a handful of Fights gets to Fight for a Title?

    No! Because different strokes for different folks. None of us develop at the same level in anything. And it makes no sense to hold a good thing back because of the speed -- of lack of speed -- of others.

    In Asian culture, we don't hold back. Forward speed is where we are in this one life. The fastest brain or brawn is giving its due on its own accord. There is no need to be on any amount of time. If you can do, BOO-HOO! Ya' da MAN!

    Notice that two of the three record holders for the quickest receiving/winning of world titles are from Asia. Notice how the percentage of teenages that have won world title belts are from Asia. Maybe it is mindset in the region that determines haps. Holla!
    Last edited by Radam G; 07-20-2014 at 02:43 PM.

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    Re: Does it Bother You When a Boxer with only a handful of Fights gets to Fight for a Title?

    Lomachenko and Rigondeaux are special type fighters. Shiming has talent as well though not on the same level. Its not like they just picked up a pair of boxing gloves, turned pro and fought for a title quickly. They all have extensive amateur backgrounds where they were all extremely successful. Yes this should be taken into consideration when thinking of where they rank as a pro despite very few pro fights. As a matter of fact, some people had Lomachenko ranked in the top 10 of their pound for pound lists after his pro debut and though I didn't have him there yet could certainly see the argument. Given these fighters backgrounds and the skill that was obvious if you watched them fight as an amateur, I have zero issue with them fighting for a belt sooner rather than later in their career.

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    Re: Does it Bother You When a Boxer with only a handful of Fights gets to Fight for a Title?

    I'm in agreement with Oubobcat and RG.

    if a boxer has the credentials of being an exceptional talent and has exhibited world class capability... Then let him bite off whatever he thinks he can chew.

    Preferably the opportunity should earned by getting past a gatekeeper. But we know that proper order isn't always followed in boxing.

    Why...because life ain't fair. At least within the world of boxing.

    Russell had about 30 fights and complained that VLo was dishing the line.
    But Russell never fought or was attempting to fight anyone in the top twenty.

    So it is what it is. Being a winner goes a long way in this sport.

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    Re: Does it Bother You When a Boxer with only a handful of Fights gets to Fight for a Title?

    OK, my turn. The common thread between the three fighters I mentioned -- Rigondeaux, Lomachenko, and Shiming -- is extensive INTERNATIONAL amateur experience. All three guys are two-time Olympic gold medalists. Rigondeaux, a 7-time Cuban national champion, supposedly had nearly 475 amateur fights.

    Those that argue that modern fighters aren't as well-schooled as fighters of yesteryear tend to ignore the amateur scene. And in my estimation, the fact that the U.S. boxing team has done poorly in recent Olympics says less about us than about "them."

    Yes there's fewer fighters, trainers, gyms, etc. in the United States nowadays than in the "old days," but the population of amateur boxers has increased significantly when we take off our jingoistic blinders and recognize that boxing is a global sport.

    When the Summer Olympics resumed in 1948 after a 12-year absence, there were teams from 59 nations. At the most recent Summer Olympics, there were 204 teams.

    Not every country sent a boxer and the growth in Olympic participation is somewhat misleading as schisms created multiple nations where only one previously existed, but the number of amateur boxers worldwide is far greater than its ever been.

    The great lightweight champion Benny Leonard had roughly 100 fights before he had the opportunity to fight for a world title, but you can't tell me that these fights were more instructive for Leonard than all of the amateur fights that Rigondeaux engaged in.

    So I have no problem seeing a guy fight for a title after only a handful of fights if he has demonstrated his mettle at the highest level of amateur competition.

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    Re: Does it Bother You When a Boxer with only a handful of Fights gets to Fight for a Title?

    Sometimes. I don't like it when guys like Danny Garcia fight the number 77 guy on premium cable and try and pass it off like a worthy championship fight.

    Bring back the old school ways. Joe Louis had the bum of the month club. He fought bums but fought something like 15 times in 20 months or something like that. He gave club fighters all over the place a chance at the Championship. It happened frequently , it was popular among the fans, and he kept active.
    I would like to see current champions travel the country giving no hope guys a shot at the title. Or at least sparring exhibitions all over the place where fans can go to a venue and watch their local man give it a go.
    Local guy Carmine Tufano sparred a few rounds against the great Tommy Hearns at Grand Central Station years ago and it was better to watch then the saxophone guy that is usually there.

    Danny Garcia should fight # 77 ,then another guy for a few rounds, and then another for a few rounds. At least it might get interesting.

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    Re: Does it Bother You When a Boxer with only a handful of Fights gets to Fight for a Title?

    Quote Originally Posted by Radam G View Post
    No! Because different strokes for different folks. None of us develop at the same level in anything. And it makes no sense to hold a good thing back because of the speed -- of lack of speed -- of others.

    In Asian culture, we don't hold back. Forward speed is where we are in this one life. The fastest brain or brawn is giving its due on its own accord. There is no need to be on any amount of time. If you can do, BOO-HOO! Ya' da MAN!

    Notice that two of the three record holders for the quickest receiving/winning of world titles are from Asia. Notice how the percentage of teenages that have won world title belts are from Asia. Maybe it is mindset in the region that determines haps. Holla!
    There we go. Different strokes for different folks. Most fighters have dozens of fights before they fight for the title. Why? They want to learn their trade. They don't want to step into the ring unprepared and get blow out of their by the experience difference enjoyed by the man he is challenging for the title. However, if an vastly-experienced and championship amateur like a Guillermo Rigondeaux or Vasyl Lomachenko comes along and says he wants to fight for a world title, the popular thinking becomes, "Make room for him." Recently, Rigondeaux challenged for and won a world title in his ninth pro fight. More recently, Vasyl Lomachenko (V-Lo) did the same in just his third pro fight.

    Some say it makes a mockery of the sport. It absolutely does not. Men like Rigondeaux and Lomachenko are unusually gifted fighters. They do things that world-rated fighters with 30 more pro fights under their belts cannot do and will probably never be able to do.

    As long as the challenger has the skills and ability to step right into a world title fight, I say let him fight.

    -Randy G.

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    Re: Does it Bother You When a Boxer with only a handful of Fights gets to Fight for a Title?

    Forget the best of the best amateurs turning pro, how about those guys who only have a handful of drawn out decisions against straw men and road sweepers, with several losses on record to boot, who get shots at major titles?

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    Re: Does it Bother You When a Boxer with only a handful of Fights gets to Fight for a Title?

    Maybe the old days were worse when great fighters like Sam Langford for one were never given a title shot !

  10. #10

    Re: Does it Bother You When a Boxer with only a handful of Fights gets to Fight for a Title?

    It does not bother me anymore because the truth is that our beloved sport is not a meritocracy. Title shots are not dependent upon just skill or record, they are given out through ancillary reasons such as draw, popularity, network associations, promoters and a myriad of other reasons. Is it fair.............ehh not really but it is just the nature of the beast.

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